Health and Hygiene

Safe water and sanitation

Across Madagascar thousands of people die every year for want of access to clean water, sanitation, and primary health-care. According to the World Health Organisation, a shocking 66% of the rural population are without access to improved water sources, and 74% of them have no access to improved sanitation.

For those that fall victim to water-borne illnesses the situation is bleak. With no free health-care and less than 2 doctors per 10,000 of the population it is little wonder that 1 in 6 Malagasy children don't make it to their fifth birthday.

Dying for a toilet

Squalid toilets are often shared by hundreds of people. We fund lasting, hygienic replacements.

Money for Madagascar helps to improve health and hygiene in isolated rural communities, which have been overlooked by the Malagasy Government and NGOs alike.

In areas where mains water is unavailable we install and renovate wells and water pumps to provide a supply of safe water. Despite the relatively low cost of such installations they are frequently beyond the means of people who are already struggling to feed themselves.

In Madagascar living conditions are often shockingly basic and building decent toilet facilities is often a very low priority. We have funded the construction of dozens of hygienic toilet facilities in schools and villages across the country. 9% of deaths in Madagascar are from diarrhoeal diseases. These simple improvements to basic hygiene have the potential to save thousands of lives and provide an example to nearby communities.

Health Education

Confonting ignorance and saving lives - an HIV and sexual health awareness workshop.

The World Health Organisation calculates that Madagascar has less than 1000 health workers in the whole country, covering an estimated 21 million people.

With doctors rare and medicine prohibitively expensive the more you can learn about keeping yourself and your family healthy the better. Money for Madagascar funds health education programmes in both urban and rural community projects. Working with women's groups, teenagers at risk, schoolchildren, teachers and farmers, education and advice is delivered by peer educators and covers basic health-care and first-aid, family planning and sexual health.